Who We Are

Who We Are

Here at FlowSport, we believe that there is an element of performance in everything we do and that most of us want to be great.

Our philosophy is rooted in evidence-based research in Sport Psychology as well as decades of personal experience as competitors, educators and coaches. We know that true learning comes when our clients play an active role in their own development, which is why our program aims to meet each person where they are, and in a way that resonates with their learning style. Our goal is to create self-determined performers who are capable of navigating the highs and lows of chasing their dreams while learning to enjoy the ride. Give us a shout and let's get started today!


Damon & Zane
Founding Partners at FlowSport

Zane Winslade

Zane Winslade

For me it begins when I was 14 years old, in New Zealand in a hall where I would go and play semi-competitive badminton on Friday nights. There were no big crowds, no official umpires and nothing at stake other than a bit of a pride. On that night, I lost a game of badminton that I really shouldn’t have. Let me set the scene….I was winning 20-13….and then….on match point, something happened…. I felt like I lost all control over my body... for some reason every shot seemed to require ridiculous amounts of concentration and energy.... I felt slow... disjointed and without any flow. I went on to, almost unbelievably, lose 10 points in a row, and was left perplexed at how something like this could happen. For me, this is what stirred a lifelong fascination with the psychology of performance in sport. I wanted to know why that happened to me and also, how that could sometimes happen to the people who are the very best in the world at their sport! In that game of badminton, I knew I certainly had the physical abilities to win, 20 points had proven that! But something was going on upstairs that held me back from playing my best, when I really needed to!

Fast forward to now, where I have accrued 20 years experience in Sport, still fascinated with the psychology of performance. I have competed as a professional Rugby player, coached youth and senior sports, been a physical education teacher and now I work as a performance coach who specializes in enhancing your mental game.

I’ve also done the study. Many years at university means I have been able to match my interests with my work. I have an undergraduate degree in sports and leisure studies, alongside graduate degrees in physical education teaching and sport psychology. Most importantly, I still play sport and now focus my energies on finding flow in Surfing, Golf, Swimming and Running.

My strengths lie in preparing athletes for consistent performance in pressure situations, I can ensure you will have the tools to develop a flexible and optimal performance mindset and I can help people push through barriers so that they can achieve the goals they want. As a co-founder of FlowSport I am excited to bring The FlowSport philosophy to the world, so we can help more people achieve their dreams.

Damon Valentino

Damon Valentino

Two events shaped how I came to be interested in how the mind affects performance. The first occurred when I was 13 years old. It was the fall of my freshman year of high school. I was on the JV cross country team. The night before a big invitational, my coach called and said our star runner had broke his ankle. We needed another runner on the varsity team, and that runner was me. I began to panic, thinking about running in an invitational with over 200 runners. I hardly slept and woke up feeling awful. Before the race started, my heart was racing, my mouth was dry and I felt exhausted. The start of the race was a large, open field. About 600 yards ahead was a narrow path that led into the woods. I heard the gun and began to sprint off the line. Full of fear, I ran as fast as I could, gasping for air, already covered in mud. I hit the path in tenth place, and when I did, something strange happened.

Suddenly, I was no longer breathing hard. I could see that the runners around me were working hard, but it was as if I was watching the race instead of running in it. As we approached the first mile, I could hear the time...4:36, 4:37, 4:38. It couldn’t be. I had never run a mile under 5 minutes, let alone in a 5K race! This feeling continued for the entire race, and although I was currently 8th on my team, I finished 3rd overall. I did not know what came over me during that race, and I never was able to replicate it the rest of the season, but it’s an experience that opened me up to a separate reality and I can still access it (even though I can’t replicate it) to this day.

The other event was on the opposite side of the spectrum. As an 18 year old high school senior, I was entering the start of tennis season. I was a nationally ranked junior who was being recruited to play Division I tennis. Up to this point in my high school career, my overall record was 65-3. I was playing #1 singles, and was considered one of the best players in the state. During our first day of practice, I hit a few forehands to my teammate, and then something terrifying happened. The ball came to my backhand, and I hit it straight into the bottom of the net. It wasn’t a typical error. Something had taken over my muscles and the shot was completely foreign to me. A wave of fear rushed through my body. The next time the ball came to my backhand, the same thing happened. In fact, that feeling stayed with me for the entire season. I was consumed with fear, overwhelmed by embarrassment and felt exposed as a fraud. Everyone who played me knew what to do, and I went through the season in utter despair. I finished the year 11-10. I went on to have a relatively successful college career at Michigan State, but every once in awhile, the demon that took over my backhand would return and I spent the next four years doing everything I could to keep it locked away.

I have always been fascinated with the mental side of performance. Whether I was coaching on the tennis court or teaching in the classroom, I knew my students’ “inner game” would often determine whether they would perform at an optimal level. This fascination led me to graduate school, where I received a Masters in Sport Psychology. As a performance coach, my focus is on helping my clients understand how what they think and feel affects how they play. I have developed an approach that takes into account educational principles and performance - based research. Each person comes with their own unique skills and challenges. It’s my life’s mission to help them become self-determined, fully aware, full of genuine confidence and capable of being their best selves. These traits carry over, because performance can be found in any of life's endeavors.